Recyclable Barbarian Battle Machines

Just another Sunday afternoon waiting for a 4 second shot to render – 9 hours and 4 minutes to go.  In the meantime I’ve been putting some thought into how how better to promote the new Killer Robots movie. Unfortunately, I’m not too fond of promoting.  As someone hoping to be a successful artist and filmmaker, I realize this is something I should probably put more energy into.

Barbarion Battle Droid

Photo by Mike McGowan

So in the spirit of promotion, here is a shot of actor, Scott Yuken as a club-wielding barbarian battle machine.  One of hundreds and the reason the above described shot is taking so long. Can you guess what recyclables were incorporated into this costume?  This is of course assuming that Scott is not actually an android sent from the future to help us finish our movie.

Thanks for checking in.  Next week, more stuff.

-Sam

Revenge of the Tower Bots

Towerbots

Hiyahh!!

Here’s a cool interview by Kirsten Nelson of Rogue Cinema about the Killer Robots new movie:

http://www.roguecinema

.com/article4007.html

Aside from that, still at work on the new KR movie. Currently in the middle of tons of rotoscoping for Strobo’s footage. His legs keep disappearing so there’s been quite a bit of layering and patching.

Also making quite a bit of headway with miniatures. Having built the majority of required models, they’re currently scattered all over the house awaiting paint jobs and filming. Yesterday I was able to shot some footage of the Towerbots – 3 story tall machines built to annihilate unwelcome visitors to the planet Vidya. Now working up the motivation to film some Galaxon battle-cruiser shots.

Stick Figures Embroiled in Epic Combat

Storyboards! One of my favorite tasks while preparing for a movie. They usually start out with a lot of detail and shading. Eventually, about 60 pages in, they start to resemble abstract scribbles. This is from one of the first sequences assembled for The Killer Robot’s Next Movie.

When we shot it we didn’t have a lot of room as our green screen didn’t stretch but a few feet. Our actress, the indomitable Jenna Hellmuth, made the most of it with slow motion leaps and short hops that, in our mind’s eye, would translate into high intensity action once the backgrounds were added and the shots trimmed.

I’m happy to report, the sequence was a nice confidence booster. On the road to production I wrote and drew all kinds of way-out stuff with just a hope that it would all somehow come together in the final product. Seeing the puppets, performers, editing and effects come together in a final cut scene is a rush every time.

Check out the finished sequence below. Hope you enjoy!

Until Next time!

Stretching Time with the Cosmic Potato

With my first feature, The Killer Robots and the Battle for the Cosmic Potato I got an idea for the story in a flash. I could hear the voices of the different characters and the jokes just seemed natural.  I wrote the script in a couple of days and added in bits and pieces throughout production.  The final script was 65 pages and to those familiar with screenwriting, that’s about 65 minutes of actual finished movie.  After producing a couple of shorts and the one feature I can attest that somehow it really does work out to about a minute of movie per page.

Dax delivers useless insight.

Now normally movies are about 90 minutes long while a few might get away with 70 minutes. I decided I needed an 80 minute movie and so added a lizard-like floating head between the different chapters of the movie.  He would recite various philosophical platitudes that really made no sense but somehow related to the story – but not really. He turned out to be a lot of fun though. Folks got a kick out of him popping up at various times through the narrative. Usually by the end he would be mercilessly booed, but that was part of the fun.

The Killer Robots and the Battle for the Cosmic Potato DVDTo further extend the movie to the 80 minute mark I constructed a rather long credit sequence at the beginning of the movie.  There were lots of flybys of computer generated planets while the names of the amazing cast and crew flashed by on-screen – all in a rich yellow and blue color scheme. Personally I love it, although watching it with an audience at Spooky Empire in 2009, I couldn’t help but think it should have been a couple of minutes shorter.

Finally I kept my shots at a leisurely 5-6 seconds long.  With dialogue extending some shots longer and some action bits coming in at around 3 seconds. I’m quite happy with the final product although when I watch it, I sometimes have an urge to trim the hell out of certain shots.  But I guess that what happens when you take on a project like this. You’re never really done with it.  You just have to walk away at some point and hope it flies.

The Killer Robots and the Battle for the Cosmic Potato is available at Amazon.com on DVD and Streaming.  More info here!